Open Source

PHP Bijoy to Unicode Converter

In our latest project at PROGmaatic, we needed a converter to convert lots of information written in Bangla. Unfortunately  everything was in Bijoy (SutonnyMJ) font. But our requirement was Unicode formatted data and language preference was PHP.

 

I thought, no big deal. There should have been lots of converters available, and most of them might be in PHP. After hours of searching (Yes I don’t like coding when I can find something free :D).

Well, I haven’t found a single script which would do what I needed. Two of the following did help me to understand how to develop the converter:

So finally I end up coding one myself. Fork it from my Github account.

In the coding process I have learnt two valuable lessons 🙂

1. javascript string method ‘substring‘ is not equivalent to PHP’s string function ‘substr‘ [I spent only 5 hours for this mistake!!!]

2. Nothing is better than step-by-step Debugging!

 

Future modifications:

1. Make mbstring independent. (I actually figured out the way, but right now I don’t need it since I have mbstring support :))

2. Make memory efficient.

 

Check the code and let me know if you find a better way, find a bug or need some modification. I will be happy to make the changes and give you the credit 🙂

 

World City locations database

For one of my projects, I need the geographical location (latitude, longitude, altitude) of all main cities of the world. It was a adobe air project to determine worldwide salat timetable automatically.

I couldn’t find a complete list. Then I found this site, Aneki World Cities. Then I designed a scrapper using PHP, and scrapped all the countries first, then their respective cities list, then respective geographical location. Then end result was a table in the database with all countries, respective cities and locations 🙂

How to enable Apache HTTP Authentication using PHP

The easiest way to password-protect a site is to use HTTP Authentication, where if a browser’s request for a protected page is not accompanied by the correct username and password, the Web server replies with an HTTP 401 error – which means “Unauthorized Access” – and an invitation for the browser to re-submit the request with a proper username and password. From the user’s point of view, most of this dialogue is hidden. Following that first failed request, the browser prompts the user (in a dialog box) for a username and password, and then re-submits the request, this time with the authentication information attached. Assuming the username/password combo is on the list of allowed users, the Web server then sends the page requested. The Web browser will likewise continue to send that username/password with all subsequent requests.

Look at the following code: